Technology and the law

tech and the law

Guidance, analysis, data and insights from the cutting edge of the legal profession.

undefinedPreparing students for the legal tech revolution

Is legal education preparing students adequately for a fast-changing profession? We interviewed Dr. Anna Elmirzayeva, who runs the MSc Legal Technology course at the University of Law.

“The dreaded hours of juniors reviewing numerous contracts are going to go and allow them to focus on the exciting parts of the work.”

undefinedBecoming a lawyer in corporate tech and venture capital

Three expert lawyers from tech-focused firm Orrick explain what it’s like to act for exciting new companies seeking investment; collaborate with first-time founders and serial entrepreneurs; and taste tests cakes for a potential expansion of a baking platform…

“Disruption in the travel sector is coming next, alongside a clearer focus on the environment and how technology can improve the way we treat our planet – think pooling of driverless cars and beyond!”


 

undefinedThe law firm of the future

AI will transform the law, and we’re only beginning to grasp its full potential. Womble Bond Dickinson is one firm on the case – we spoke to a few of their experts about its impact on the whole profession.

“These technologies speed up processes and make life easier rather than removing the need for junior input.”


 

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Becoming a legal engineer

Want to take your law degree in a new direction? We interviewed Jeremy Huitson, a legal engineer at Juro, who did just that.

“Legal tech is at an exciting transitionary period… over the next few years we’re going to see heavyweights emerge and dominate the market.”

 

undefinedBecoming a tech transactions lawyer – the view from White & Case

Innovation is the name of the game for White & Case's expert tech transactions lawyers. Budding attorneys will have to keep up with the latest advances in tech; master multiple transaction types for companies in various industries; and help to answer intriguing questions such as 'who's the author of an artwork produced by an AI program?'

"...we are seeing ever increasing digital convergence between the technology industry and other industries such as financial services and healthcare..."

undefinedThe rise of self-driving cars

Join us as we take a drive down AV boulevard with the experts at Dykema to put you in pole position for a career working on the self-driving revolution.

"For the producer, for the true believers who are pushing the industry forward, they think they’re saving lives. And that’s why they do it; it’s the driving force of what they do.” 

 

Firms with a distinct technology focus

Bird & BirdBristowsCovington & Burling | Harbottle & Lewis | Osborne ClarkTaylor Vinters | Taylor Wessing

Other firms with a tech/media seat

Baker McKenzie | Bates Wells | Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner | Cleary | Clifford Chance | CMS | DentonsDLA Piper | Farrer & Co | Fox Williams | Freeths | Freshfields | Goodwin | Gowling WLG | Hogan Lovells | Howes Percival | Kirkland & Ellis | Latham & Watkins | Linklaters | Memery Crystal | Mills & Reeve | Mishcon de Reya | Norton Rose Fulbright | Orrick | Paul Hastings | Penningtons Manches Cooper | Pinsent Masons | Reed Smith | Ropes & Gray | RPC | Simkins | Simmons & Simmons | Slaughter and May | Squire Patton Boggs | TLT | Travers Smith | Womble Bond Dickinson


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Slaughter and May's innovation competition

 

Deadline for submissions: 16 April 2021

 

Slaughter and May is launching a new competition for students (both law and non-law) focusing on innovation in legal services. Students are invited to join us in re-thinking legal service delivery by answering one of the following questions:

  1. Legal careers in the future are likely to look very different to the present. In the future, what roles do you think will exist in the legal sector and what skills will future lawyers need to develop and why?
  2. Is there more to legal innovation than technology?
  3. How can innovation support diversity and inclusion in law firms?
  4. What will the world of work look like in the future, and how will that change what lawyers do?

Slaughter and May would love to see creative responses to these challenges and entries can be in any form such as a video, podcast, blog post or infographic.

The winner will receive £1,000 and a week’s work experience with the Knowledge and Innovation team. Second and third place will receive £500 and £250 respectively.

For more information, including details of how to enter, please visit the Slaughter and May website. 


undefinedChambers FinTech

This is a is a comprehensive guide to the leading Fintech firms across the world. Chambers ranking guides are compiled by interviewing clients and analysing law firms' work porfolios. They set the global standard for measuring capability in the legal profession.


 

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STEM students: how to become a commercial lawyer

With the help of global firm Clifford Chance, we discover how a background in science, technology, engineering or maths could be the golden ticket to a challenging and rewarding legal career.

“Challenging theories is what we do day to day as lawyers.”